Ohai Iceree ~
Icelee Jean. 23. San Diego. UCI Alum (Zotzotzot!).

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Seriously, I don’t know how it was even possible for me to go almost 2 years without seeing you both! Thank you ladies for spending the evening with me and pretty much picking up right where we all left off. 😍😍😍 #PLAYPEN #60percent #roomies

Seriously, I don’t know how it was even possible for me to go almost 2 years without seeing you both! Thank you ladies for spending the evening with me and pretty much picking up right where we all left off. 😍😍😍 #PLAYPEN #60percent #roomies

aptaow:

girlwithalessonplan:

chase-me-charlie:

fightingforanimals:

These are some of them, most were golden retrivers and labradors, but also included german shepherds and other breeds. Sadly most are dead now, while many people forget them and don’t spare them a thought. 

As people lay dying, trapped and hurt, a team of nearly 100 loyal and courageous search dogs put their lives on the line to help humans. Without them, many more would not have survived, yet few people consider them. 

In such a chaotic, terrifying, hot, acrid-smelling, smokey and loud environment, countless human lives depended on their ability to focus, listen, respond to their handlers, and work tirelessly. Stepping over cracked glass, hot tarmac, through flames and thick smoke, being winched over deep ravines, they battled on to seek out survivors and bring them aid. 

They worked around the clock, day and night, searching, sniffing, over and over. Not only did they search, but they comforted - many eyewitnesses speak of how the dogs would stop and sit by newly-recovered victims, giving them a sense of hope and relief, before moving on to look for the next. As the situation became desperate, and the rescue workers and fire teams became utterly distraught at the amount of people who were recovered dead, these dogs brought them comfort, sitting with them on breaks, letting them grieve.

Many of these dogs are old, and have passed away. Let us remember the courage and loyalty they showed at such a horrendous event. They didn’t have a choice, but nonetheless they did what was asked of them and helped save countless lives. Don’t let their bravery be forgotten today either, or their determination to be a ‘good dog’ despite the scary and dangerous environment around them.

And let’s not forget that these dogs actually became depressed when they kept finding dead bodies; they thought they were failing to save people. The workers helping had to hide in the ruble just to let the dogs find a living person and lift their spirits.

We gave our dogs a button to sniff,   
or a tissue, and they bounded off   
confident in their training,   
in the power of their senses   
to recreate the body,   
but after eighteen hours in rubble   
where even steel was pulverized   
they curled on themselves   
and stared up at us   
and in their soft huge eyes   
we saw mirrored the longing for death:   
then we had to beg a stranger   
to be a victim and crouch   
behind a girder, and let the dogs   
discover him and tug him   
proudly, with suppressed yaps,   
back to Command and the rows   
of empty triage tables.   
But who will hide from us?   
Who will keep digging for us   
here in the cloud of ashes?
—“Searchers” by D. Nurske

The last known surviving rescue dog from 9/11 is Bretagne, a golden retriever. She is 15 years old now, making her 2 years old during the tragic event.

I’m posting this because out of DOZENS of stained smears this was the only one that came out. 😒😒😒 This is my life now uhuuhuuuuu~ 😭 #microbiology

I’m posting this because out of DOZENS of stained smears this was the only one that came out. 😒😒😒 This is my life now uhuuhuuuuu~ 😭 #microbiology

eviscerator:

This device uses infrared technology to help find veins
How? Well it works in a similar way to pulse oximetry. Haemoglobin in the blood absorbs infrared light. When AccuVein’s device is held above the skin, it can detect the difference in the haemoglobin concentration between the veins and surrounding tissue, projecting a map of the veins on the skin above them. Locating the point of needle placement is suddenly simplified for phlebotomy techniques.
This technique has been used for some time when drawing blood from newborns, but is now becoming more frequently used in adults. Those with particularly difficult venous access (DVA) can include:
The elderly;
Dark-skinned patients, whose veins may not be visible;
Obese patients, whose veins may not be visible or palpable;
Patients having many diagnostic or therapeutic intravenous procedures;
Burn victims;
Agitated or restless patients;
Oncology patients on chemotherapy;
Other patients with chronic diseases;
Drug abusers.

Weeeeehhhh.Probably won’t have these when I do my phlebotomy licensure lol.

eviscerator:

This device uses infrared technology to help find veins

How? Well it works in a similar way to pulse oximetry. Haemoglobin in the blood absorbs infrared light. When AccuVein’s device is held above the skin, it can detect the difference in the haemoglobin concentration between the veins and surrounding tissue, projecting a map of the veins on the skin above them. Locating the point of needle placement is suddenly simplified for phlebotomy techniques.

This technique has been used for some time when drawing blood from newborns, but is now becoming more frequently used in adults. Those with particularly difficult venous access (DVA) can include:

  • The elderly;
  • Dark-skinned patients, whose veins may not be visible;
  • Obese patients, whose veins may not be visible or palpable;
  • Patients having many diagnostic or therapeutic intravenous procedures;
  • Burn victims;
  • Agitated or restless patients;
  • Oncology patients on chemotherapy;
  • Other patients with chronic diseases;
  • Drug abusers.

Weeeeehhhh.

Probably won’t have these when I do my phlebotomy licensure lol.

(Source: accuvein.com, via ma-ballin)

Ohai~!

Welp, I started school about 3 weeks ago, which means I’m 3 weeks into my program. My fall semester is comprised of two lectures and labs, 4 days a week and roughly 6+ hours per day in a laboratory. Apparently I had the option of opting out of one of the labs and sticking to a single class, but my counselor was like, “you should take both! You’ll be ahead blah blah blah.” I always get conned into taking on the challenging load somehow. -___- It probably feels like a bit of a struggle for me because the last time I had a full course load with lectures and lab classes like this was when I was still doing my undergrad at UCI. Hematology and medical microbiology are no joke, but I think I’m getting back into that groove of consistent studying and productivity. During these starting weeks I would get overwhelmed with the material I needed to memorize, the tests and quizzes I need to take, all of these different scientific techniques I need to practice, and the pressure of proving to myself that I can excel as a scientist. But of course just as the self-doubt comes to settle in, I ended up taking three quizzes today that all came back 90-100%, with the class average being around 65%. This is definitely a sign that I’m probably going to be okay lol, but on a more important note, I really should be more confident in my abilities and the effort I’m putting into everything. It might be nice to do without the unnecessary stress haha. >.> With that said, school is as it should be, busy, lengthly, and learning-filled. What isn’t wonderful is commuting to and from Mira Mesa during the times where traffic is terrible. Well it’s not that bad, I’ve just been spoiled before with short, not-so-bad commutes. :3

Also, since before school started I’ve taken a break from dancing, and I actually made the decision to leave the studio I was with. There were several reasons that factored into my decision to leave, but all in all it was a clean break. I know, I’m making it sound like a break up, but that’s really what it felt like! Especially when I’ve made so many friends through it. I’m truly thankful for being welcomed into a halau where I could improve my skills as a dancer and as a performer. Despite my school schedule preventing me from continuing with my previous halau, I do plan on continuing again soon. Very soon, actually, now that I know exactly when I CAN be free. I’m looking into some of the more traditional hula halaus this time around, and quite possibly groups that do competitions. I’ll try to keep my options open for now (if anyone has any ideas or suggestions please lmk kthnx!).

Sooooo, just when I thought I would be getting to old for crazy, drunken debauchery, I’ll apparently be going to Vegas in less than 2 months. I have been in dire need of one of those weekends. AND! It’ll be Jemmy’s first time. >:] I has exciiiiiitesssss~! Can it be October already puhhhleeeease?!

Spoons and nosies! 😍👶💙 #nephew #mattchuchu

Nonosina is ALWAYS on point.

(Source: rosabelleblogs)

Kathryn Stockett, The Help (via kushandwizdom)

nanamochiko 

(via lynnloove)


"Man, your dog is super cute." I kid you not, our vet never fails to express that whenever I bring him in for his monthly shots lol. Those pointy ears and those big beady eyes get me every time. ☺️🐶 #nationaldogday #momothechihuahua

"Man, your dog is super cute." I kid you not, our vet never fails to express that whenever I bring him in for his monthly shots lol. Those pointy ears and those big beady eyes get me every time. ☺️🐶 #nationaldogday #momothechihuahua

He is essentially the uniqlo bear. 🐻 Oh and it’s Monday so I suppose I’ve gotta mention some form of fondness I have for this person. 😳 #mcm #whatevenisthat #hesokayiguess

He is essentially the uniqlo bear. 🐻 Oh and it’s Monday so I suppose I’ve gotta mention some form of fondness I have for this person. 😳 #mcm #whatevenisthat #hesokayiguess